Theres a Word for It by Admin Online

Theres a Word for It
Title : Theres a Word for It
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780375426179
Language : English
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 256

Word geeks (1984), rejoice! Crack open these covers and immerse yourself in a mind-expanding (1963) compendium of the new words (or new meanings of words) that have sprung from American life to ignite the most vital, inventive, fruitful, and A-OK (1961) lexicographical Big Bang (1950) since the first no-brow (1922) Neanderthal grunted meaningfully.From the turn of the twenWord geeks (1984), rejoice! Crack open these covers and immerse yourself in a mind-expanding (1963) compendium of the new words (or new meanings of words) that have sprung from American life to ignite the most vital, inventive, fruitful, and A-OK (1961) lexicographical Big Bang (1950) since the first no-brow (1922) Neanderthal grunted meaningfully.From the turn of the twentieth century to today, our language has grown from around 90,000 new words to some 500,000—at least, that’s today’s best guesstimate (1936). What accounts for this quantum leap (1924)? In There’s a Word for It, language expert Sol Steinmetz


Share


Theres a Word for It Reviews

  • David

    This turned out to be a pretty nifty book. I hope to get the chance at some later point to explain why. (Of course, you have to factor in my total word-nerdness when you interpret the four star evaluation)

  • Steven

    "There's a Word for It: The Explosion of the American Language Since 1900", This book presents a wonderfully organized chronology (by year, not a specific decade) of words.For example: 1915: abstraction (art), adland, aerobatics, airbrush (v.), etc.As a lover of words, when I first came across this book in my local library, I joyfully checked it out, read it, scribed notes from it, in one day.Three additional books I strongly recommend for word lovers are: "Phraseology", "Word Museum", and "Dict [...]

  • Grace

    Sol Steinmetz's "There's a Word for it: The Explosion of the American Language Since 1900" is a quick and fun read detailing the explosion of words and phrases that entered into the American English lexicon over 110 years (1900 - 2010). For such a small book, it packs a lot of interesting tidbits of information and it is an impressive cultural and historical overview of America during the time frame. For example, did you know that soap operas got their name because the programs were typically sp [...]

  • Jessica Heck

    Ummm.I think reading this book will definitely qualify you as a word geek (as if reading a book on the history of sentence diagramming did not). Basically, it's history told through language. It's divided into decades with a 4-5 summary of the events of the decade, with the new words highlighted throughout. Then, for each decade, there is also a list of some of the words added to the dictionary in that decade. It's fascinating to see how the history of those years is reflected by the words they [...]

  • Peter Heisler

    This is almost more enjoyable as a trip through American history and pop culture than for the words themselves (though some of the superlative coinages recognized by the American Dialect Society and included in this book are pretty clever). The book is organized by decade, with a few pages of narration at the front of each chapter and then a selection of words that appeared during the decade. It can be a little bit of a slog reading through a multi-page list of words, but it's worth it: Steinmet [...]

  • Ken Kugler

    I love word origins but I am too lazy to actually go through the Oxford English Dictionary. Sol Steinmetz breaks the book down by decade and starts each one with interesting facts about that time period. Then there are the surprises such as the word Ms. I bet all of you thought that it came about in late 60's or 70's and if you did you would be way wrong. He cites the OED as finding it fist use was in 1901 when a writer in the newspaper, the New Era, in Humeston, Iowa used it. In the decade foll [...]

  • Lawrence A

    Fun book about neologisms in American English since 1900, although it's authoritativeness as to particular dates that new words entered the lexicon is suspect. The term "mathlete" was common in the 1970s, yet Steinmetz dates it to the 2000s. SLR (for "single lens reflex") cameras were advertised under that term in 1985, when I purchased my wife her first Nikon, yet Steinmetz reports that this abbreviation didn't become current until 25 years later. Oh well. Any book that begins its discussion of [...]

  • Kirsti

    One of those books that looks so great in the catalog but turns out to be rather dry. I don't say this often, but I wish this book had been a website rather than a paper book. It would be more fun to read if it were hyperlinked rather than linear. But it did introduce me to the word snowclone, which is a formulaic cliché, such as "X is the new Y" or "To X or not to X."

  • Mike

    Very informative book. Not only did it discuss the prominent words during each decade since 1900, it also told the stories in each decade that influenced the usage and origin of these words.