Prinny and His Pals by Admin Online

Prinny and His Pals
Title : Prinny and His Pals
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780720613261
Language : English
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 240

From the first biography of George IV in 1831 to the last in 2001, Mad King George’s son has commonly been held up to ridicule as a weak, selfish, and incompetent spendthrift, barely tolerated by his ministers, loathed by most of his family, and dependent on the emotional support of grasping mistresses. However, acclaimed historian Tom Ambrose—author of Godfather of the ReFrom the first biography of George IV in 1831 to the last in 2001, Mad King George’s son has commonly been held up to ridicule as a weak, selfish, and incompetent spendthrift, barely tolerated by his ministers, loathed by most of his family, and dependent on the emotional support of grasping mistresses. However, acclaimed historian Tom Ambrose—author of Godfather of the Revolution: The Life of Phillipe Egalité, Duc D’Orléans—has uncovered new details on "Prinny" that suggests that, for all his faults, George IV just may have been the most humane and amusing of all British monarchs, notwithstanding his lo


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Prinny and His Pals Reviews

  • Dorian

    Rather a disappointing work, overall.The author's contention is that George IV did not deserve all the opprobrium heaped upon him, and was in fact a really nice guy, as evidenced by his myriad of cool friends. Unfortunately, I didn't feel he adequately demonstrated this. George IV may have been intelligent, charming, generous, and witty - but he was also juvenile, over-emotional, a drunkard, a gambler, and a shocking spendthrift. He didn't come across to me in this book as particularly likeable. [...]

  • Rachel Knowles

    A very readable look at the different friendships formed by George IV, from the fashionable Beau Brummell to the architect John Nash, and from the disreputable company of the gambling Whig Charles James Fox to the devotion of the Scottish poet and author Sir Walter Scott.The book was different from other biographies of George IV that I have read because it centred on his friendships rather than other aspects of his life. But if its purpose was to convince me of George IV's gift for friendship, t [...]

  • Yooperprof

    A lot of proofreading errors, and some factual errors, too.On the positive side, some of the chapters were fairly interesting, and I have to give the guy some credit for taking on the tough job of trying to portray George IV as something other than a dissolute and corpulent buffoon.

  • Laura Purcell

    I was disappointed to find a number of inaccuracies in this book, ranging from incorrect dates to referring to George's cousin Gloucester as his 'brother'. The conclusion that George IV was a 'man of the people' and loved by the working class thoroughly bemused me, as it is in direct conflict with all I have read and researched about this monarch.