The Literary Absolute by Admin Online

The Literary Absolute
Title : The Literary Absolute
Author :
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ISBN : 9780887066610
Language : English
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 169

The Literary Absolute is the first authoritative study of the emergence of the modern concept of literature in German romanticism. The authors trace this concept from the philosophical crisis bequeathed by Kant to his successors, to its development by the central figures of the Athenaeum group: the Schlegel brothers, Schelling, and Novalis.This study situates the Jena romaThe Literary Absolute is the first authoritative study of the emergence of the modern concept of literature in German romanticism. The authors trace this concept from the philosophical crisis bequeathed by Kant to his successors, to its development by the central figures of the Athenaeum group: the Schlegel brothers, Schelling, and Novalis.This study situates the Jena romantics' "fragmentary" model of literature--a model of literature as the production of its own theory--in relation to the development of a post-Kantian conception of philosophy as the total and reflective auto-production of the thinking subject. Analyz


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The Literary Absolute Reviews

  • Meghan O'Dea

    One of the lines that most struck me in The Literary Absolute was the Jean-Luc Nancy and Phillippe Lacaue-Labarthe's explanation of what was so absolute about Romantic literature, “Rather, it is theory itself as literature or, in other words, literature producing itself as it produces its own theory. The literary absolute is also, and perhaps above all, this absolute literary operation.” This perhaps best sums up what they attempt to do with this work-- that is, the authors don't so much pre [...]

  • Daniel Cheng

    Manfred Frank once called The Literary Absolute the most important book ever written on German Romanticism and it’s hard to deny this claim given its central place in the field of German Romantic studies.Lacoue-Labarthe and Nancy characterize German Romanticism as a reaction to the Kantian theoretical revolution. More specifically, the Romantics grappled with the problem of Kant’s emptying of the subject: “From the moment the subject is emptied of all substance, the pure form it assumes is [...]