Written Country by Admin Online

Written Country
Title : Written Country
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9789814189668
Language : English
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 356

This book is an anthology that intriguingly reconstructs the history of modern Singapore through fifty defining moments from the Fall of Singapore to the passing of Lee Kuan Yew, and more. Some of Singapore’s best novelists, poets and playwrights have contributed to this anthology, including Alfian Sa’at, Catherine Lim, Edwin Thumboo, Felix Cheong, Michael Chiang and RoberThis book is an anthology that intriguingly reconstructs the history of modern Singapore through fifty defining moments from the Fall of Singapore to the passing of Lee Kuan Yew, and more. Some of Singapore’s best novelists, poets and playwrights have contributed to this anthology, including Alfian Sa’at, Catherine Lim, Edwin Thumboo, Felix Cheong, Michael Chiang and Robert Yeo, amongst many more.


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Written Country Reviews

  • Joan

    the problem with this book, i feel, is that it is a very good concept that does not play out in writing. the concept of the antho is actually pretty interesting. i think it's one that's been done before, but it's quite interesting to see how things are put together and the narrative constructed. if you're looking for the history of singapore, it's a pretty decent book, i guess. individually, there are some standout piecese problem arises though, because the way that the book is edited makes it v [...]

  • Jon

    This wonderful anthology tells Singapore’s history through excerpts of prose, drama and poetry. A brief informative commentary on key events from the fall of Singapore to the death of Lee Kuan Yew accompanies the literary texts. Gwee Li Sui’s introduction sets out the editorial principles guiding his approach to the selection and arrangement of the texts. The discussion raises fascinating issues on: - the ’factually sound and the emotionally consistent’, - the play between first hand and [...]

  • David

    A novel concept that in execution unfortunately reveals how slim and of variable quality the current body of English-language Singapore literature is. The early parts, particularly with the perhaps inevitable repetition of Meira Chand, Rex Shelley and Goh Sin Tub, are extremely dreary, while the later bits pick up pace with their shorter and more interesting entries, even though there is the conflict-of-interest inclusion of the editor's lame poem. A more bold book would have circumvented the ci [...]